Amsler grid

Save your Sight with an Amsler Grid: Free macular degeneration test

Save your Sight with an Amsler Grid: Free macular degeneration test

Macular degeneration (age related macular degeneration) is the leading cause of blindness in Australia. It is possible to reduce the risk of losing sight from macular degeneration by living a healthy lifestyle and having your macula checked regularly by an eye health professional.

The Amsler grid is an easy to use self- monitoring tool that can detect changes in your vision. The changes in your vision may be signs of macular degeneration or other eye diseases. The Amsler grid has a printed grid with a dot in the center.

Click Here For Image Source

If you’re at risk for macular degeneration or other eye diseases, or over the age of 50, you can use the chart once a week at home to monitor your vision. Early detection means early treatment.

Macular Disease Foundation Australian advise people that have been diagnosed with early signs of macular degeneration to use the Amsler Grid every day to determine any deterioration.

How to use the Amsler grid :

  • Wear the glasses or contact lenses you normally use for reading
  • Hold the Amsler grid at normal reading distance in a well-lit room
  • Fully cover one eye then use the uncovered eye to focus on the centre dot
  • Repeat the process with the other eye.

When used in this way, one eye at a time, potential issues can be identified in individual eyes. These changes may include distortion of lines – straight lines may appear wavy or bent. Additionally, dark or empty spaces may appear.

The Amsler grid should not be used in place of seeking advice from a medical professional. It should be used to detect early changes that should then be immediately reported to your eye doctor. Your doctor will then perform a comprehensive eye exam.

You can request an Amsler grid from your eye doctor or order a free Amsler grid from Macular Disease Foundation Australia.

You can contact the Macular Disease Foundation Australia on the National Helpline: 1800 111 709 and Focus Eye Centre on (02) 9663 3927 for more information.

cataract considerations

Cataract Considerations

Cataracts are a clouding of the crystalline lens of the eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to read, drive a car (especially at night) or see the expression on a friend’s face.

Most cataracts develop slowly and don’t disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision. According to Medibank Better Health Index there is an increase in Australians living with cataracts, particularly women aged over 80.

At first, stronger lighting and prescription glasses can help you deal with cataracts. When your prescription glasses can’t clear your vision, the only effective treatment for cataracts is surgery. Fortunately, modern day cataract surgery is a very safe and effective procedure with a success rate of over 95%. For most patients, having cataract surgery also provides the opportunity to eliminate glasses for some tasks.

To determine whether you have a cataract, visit our highly qualified surgeons at FOCUS EYE CENTRE. Our surgeons will review your medical history and symptoms and perform an eye examination.  Surgeons usually recommend a microsurgical procedure to remove the cataract from the eye if the cataracts affect your quality of life, interfere with your ability to perform normal daily activities, such as reading or driving at night or prevent the examination or detection of other eye diseases in the future.

FOCUS EYE CENTRE uses leading technology, the Alcon Infiniti Vision System (Phacoemulsifier) to perform cataract surgery. The clouded lens is removed using the phacoemulsification (emulsification of the lens using an ultrasonic hand piece) and is then replaced with an intraocular artificial lens. The artificial lens remains a permanent part of your eye. The implanted lens is selected very carefully so as to correct the patient’s refractive error. Some lens implants can correct astigmatism. Some implants are custom made to suit an individual need. The procedure is performed using local anaesthesia and intra-venous sedation.

Cataract surgery is safe and serious complications are rare but need to be considered. As with any surgery, there are associated risks which include cloudy vision, pressure rise, damage or dislocation of the lens, inflammation, infection, blindness, bleeding and loss of eyesight.

After the procedure, you’ll have some discomfort for a few days. Healing generally occurs within eight weeks. If you need cataract surgery in both eyes, your doctor will schedule surgery to remove the cataract in the second eye after you’ve healed from the first surgery.

If you choose not to undergo cataract surgery now, our surgeons may recommend periodic follow-up exams to see if your cataracts are progressing. How often you’ll see our surgeon depends on your situation. To book your consultation in today, or to find our more, call our friendly team on: (02) 9663 3927

laser vision correction

Seeing is Believing: Laser Vision Correction

Imagine waking up in the morning and not having to reach for your glasses or put in your contacts. Many people are either nearsighted, farsighted or have astigmatism. These common eye conditions are known as refractive errors. If you want clear and sharp vision, connect with our highly qualified surgeons at Focus Eye Centre, who can use advanced laser vision correction to correct and improve your vision.

Focus Eye Centre Directors

Focus Directors, Dr Richard Smith and Dr Margaret Kearns commenced practice in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs 32 years ago. Dr Smith and Dr Kearns pioneered laser eye surgery in Australia 20 years ago and continue to use the best laser eye technology available.

Dr Richard Smith believes, “The decision to have eye surgery depends on finding people you can trust. You need to feel assured that they are properly qualified and highly experienced. Moreover you hope to find people who will be highly communicative and totally honest. We aspire to these ideals”.

Leading Australia in Modern laser Vision Correction

Laser technology and medical procedures to correct refractive errors have all been scientifically validated and clinically tested.

Focus Eye Centre performs four main types of laser vision correction procedures. These procedures correct a wide range of vision errors.

The main types of laser vision correction procedures performed at Focus Eye centre include;

Our highly qualified surgeons at Focus Eye Centre will do a thorough assessment and develop the right treatment plan with you.

“We are out to give people the best vision they can possibly have, and our latest lasers do it more precisely, more easily and more safely than ever before. My greatest satisfaction is seeing someone happy with their result.”

Dr Richard Smith Focus Owner/Director, Surgeon

Focus Eye Centre uses advanced lasers that are smart, fast and gentle. Our lasers have an inbuilt patient support system that provides extra comfort and relaxation during treatment. The system continuously monitors the patient’s position during the procedure and will automatically make comfort adjustments.

Laser treatments are carried out in our licensed, accredited day surgery centre, which maintain full operating theatre standards.

Healing with minimum discomfort

In most cases, patients see clearly 2-hours after the procedure and vision stabilizes within a week. Patients are normally able to drive, work, wear makeup and participate in sports, just a few days following treatment.

If a life without the hassle of glasses or contact lenses sounds ideal and you’d like to take the first step, make an appointment with Focus Eye Centre today: (02) 9663 3927

sunglass standard

New Mandatory Sunglass Standard

From 1 July 2019, sunglass and fashion spectacle suppliers must comply with mandatory requirements set out in the Consumer Goods (Sunglasses and Fashion Spectacles) Safety Standard 2017. The mandatory standard is based on sections of the voluntary Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 1067.1:2016 eye and face protection – sunglasses and fashion spectacles (available from SAI Global).

The mandatory standard for sunglasses and fashion spectacles applies to non-prescription sunglasses mounted in a spectacle frame; rimless sunshields and one piece visors; clip-on and slipon type sunglasses; children’s sunglasses, and fashion spectacles and light tint sunglasses.

It does not apply to prescription and readymade spectacles; safety glasses and safety goggles intended to provide protection against optical radiation other than from the sun; eyewear for protection against radiation in solaria; eye protectors for sport, and glasses for use as toys and clearly and legibly labelled as toys.

KEY REQUIREMENTS

Following is an overview of the safety standards requirements, this is intended as a guide only. The legislation should be consulted for detailed information.

Ultraviolet Radiation 

The mandatory standard requires that sunglasses must protect users from ultraviolet radiation (UV) from 280 and 400 nanometres.

Testing 

The mandatory standard specifies marking and labelling requirements as well as testing procedures to ensure sunglasses and fashion spectacles meet specific performance, construction, and labelling requirements. Suppliers need to arrange this testing through specialist laboratories.

MARKING AND LABELING

Marking or labelling must not be obscured by other important information, eg. price labels. All assembled sunglasses must be labelled with the identity of the manufacturer or supplier; the lens category number; the lens category description and usage information; and if applicable, the symbol ‘Not suitable for driving and road use’. Category symbols are optional, if used they must comply with Table 5 AS/ NZS 1067.1:2016.

CLASSIFICATIONS

Sunglasses and fashion spectacles are classified into five categories by their performance suitability for use in certain conditions as follows:

  • Lens category 0: Fashion spectacles – these are not sunglasses as they have a very low ability to reduce sun glare. They provide limited or no UV protection.
  • Lens category 1: Fashion spectacles – like category 0 lenses, these are not sunglasses, however they do provide limited sun glare reduction and some UV protection. Fashion spectacles with category 1 lenses are not suitable for driving at night.
  • Lens category 2: Sunglasses – these sunglasses provide a medium level of sun glare reduction and good UV protection.
  • Lens category 3: Sunglasses – these sunglasses provide a high level of sun glare reduction and good UV protection.
  • Lens category 4: Sunglasses – these are special purpose sunglasses that provide a very high level of sun glare reduction and good UV protection. Lens category 4 sunglasses must not be used when driving at any time.

Finola Carey is the CEO of Optical Distributors and Manufacturers Association. For the full article, visit mivision.com.au.

Macula Month

May is Macula Month!

Macula Month – 1 to 31 May 2019

Macula Month is an initiative of Macular Disease Foundation Australia and runs for the month of May. It is an annual campaign designed to raise awareness of macular disease, which includes age-related macular degeneration and diabetic eye disease, along with other less common diseases of the macula. Macular disease is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Australia.

Macula Month 2019 calls on Australians to reduce their risk of developing macular disease by following four simple steps:

Step 1: See your optometrist for a comprehensive eye examination including a macula check;

Step 2: Adopt an eye healthy diet and lifestyle;

Step 3: Have a conversation with your family about eye health; and

Step 4: Order a free information kit.

To order a kit or find out more contact Macular Disease Foundation Australia on 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au/resources

Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss in Australians over 50, with 1.29 million people having some evidence of the disease [1]. Age-related macular degeneration causes progressive loss of central vision, leaving the peripheral or side vision intact.

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic